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Job Unhappiness

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Harvard Business Review reports that “happy people are 31% more productive, have 37% higher sales, and are three times more creative than their peers.” Are you happy at your job, or are you a victim of job unhappiness?

I’m Good Not Great

You work for an organization that you are proud of. You know they value you and your contributions and you enjoy your co-workers and your boss….but, lately, you feel like you are on autopilot. Maybe you aren’t learning and developing new skills? Work with your boss to focus on broadening your work and your impact. Attend a workshop or conference, outline some ideas for personal growth and target your strengths that are being underutilized. What are you curious about within your organization? Focus on where you could be in a year and cure your job unhappiness.

I’m Dissatisfied

Your boredom or concern about your position has persisted for several weeks or months. Again, talk to your supervisor. Research other positions in the company. Could you broaden your scope and increase your value by making a lateral move that you would find more interesting? Is the problem really your job or is your dissatisfaction coming from your life outside of work? No job is perfect – is your attitude the issue? Talk it through with your valued associates.

I’m Really Unhappy at Work

If you don’t like your organization or your manager, it is time to update your resume and look for a new job. If you don’t like your coworkers and don’t believe in the work that you are doing or you are feeling unappreciated and are clearly underpaid, search the job boards. Some things aren’t in your power to fix. Make sure you stay professional and confirm over time that your job unhappiness, your company and the other people in your department aren’t going to change. Sometimes a job is just not a good match and it is time to find a better one.

Decide to be Happy

Neil Pasricha, author of The Happiness Equation: Want Nothing + Do Anything = Have Everything, says that people think if they do great work and become a big success then they’ll be satisfied. Pasricha found that equation to actually be backward. If we are content, then we will do great work and become successful. Happiness comes first, not last”

Where are you on the spectrum of job unhappiness? Contact Smith Hanley Associates’ Pharmaceutical Commercial Analytics Executive Recruiter, Eda Zullo at ezullo@smithhanley.com

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